Haleigh Collins
& SR Lejeune

Natalie Beall, Utility Suite (Concertina), 2024, Canson Mi Teintes paper and pH Neutral Lineco adhesive, 25 x 19 1/2 in. Photo courtesy Pierre le Hors.

Natalie Beall, Utility Suite (Concertina), 2024, Canson Mi Teintes paper and pH
Neutral Lineco adhesive, 25 x 19 1/2 in. Photo courtesy Pierre le Hors.

Pepper Tree, North Loop’s first exhibition on the west coast, takes place in a 1920s residence in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, joining the city’s century-long and storied tradition of art galleries operating out of private houses. The exhibition brings together seven artists who explore the intimate lives of household objects and domestic spaces in their work. The exhibition is titled after a letter written by the previous owners of 2841 Hollyridge Drive to the current resident and includes a lengthy “In Memoriam” dedicated to a single California pepper tree that once stood on the property. In their reminiscing about the many gatherings and conversations that took place under the tree’s shade, the former owners conjure how memories accumulate in domestic spaces and the spectral ways in which they can supersede current realities. In varying ways, each artist in Pepper Tree takes up ideas surrounding the deeply personal and ultimately unknowable nostalgia that we imbue into the spaces and objects we live among every day.

Natalie Beall, Utility Suite (Concertina), 2024, Canson Mi Teintes paper and pH Neutral Lineco adhesive, 25 x 19 1/2 in. Photo courtesy Pierre le Hors.

Natalie Beall, Utility Suite (Concertina), 2024, Canson Mi Teintes paper and pH
Neutral Lineco adhesive, 25 x 19 1/2 in. Photo courtesy Pierre le Hors.

Pepper Tree, North Loop’s first exhibition on the west coast, takes place in a 1920s residence in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, joining the city’s century-long and storied tradition of art galleries operating out of private houses. The exhibition brings together seven artists who explore the intimate lives of household objects and domestic spaces in their work. The exhibition is titled after a letter written by the previous owners of 2841 Hollyridge Drive to the current resident and includes a lengthy “In Memoriam” dedicated to a single California pepper tree that once stood on the property. In their reminiscing about the many gatherings and conversations that took place under the tree’s shade, the former owners conjure how memories accumulate in domestic spaces and the spectral ways in which they can supersede current realities. In varying ways, each artist in Pepper Tree takes up ideas surrounding the deeply personal and ultimately unknowable nostalgia that we imbue into the spaces and objects we live among every day.